Healthy Lifestyle for Healthy Life

 

 

 

 

All that heart-healthy advice about eating the right foods, exercising and losing weight pay off in real life for both men and women, two new studies show. The reports, both originating at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and published in the July 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, focused on different aspects of cardiovascular risk in two large groups: the 83,882 women in the second Nurses' Health Study, and the 20,900 men in the Physicians' Health Study I. Both arrived at the same conclusion: Do the right things, and you get measurable benefits.


In Men

The study in men looked at the relationship between the lifetime risk of heart failure and six lifestyle factors: obesity, exercise, smoking, alcohol intake, consumption of breakfast cereals, and consumption of fruits and vegetables.

That look found a straight-line relationship between adherence to healthy lifestyle factors and the risk of heart failure, the progressive loss of ability to pump blood that is often a prelude to death. The lifetime risk of heart failure in the 22-year study was about one in five in men who ignored the advice about all beneficial lifestyle factors and one in 10 for those who adhered to four or more of the factors.

"The one with a huge difference was adiposity," Djousse said. "The risk of heart failure was 17 percent in men who were overweight or obese, and about 11 percent in those of normal weight."

Exercise was the next most important. Heart failure occurred in 11 percent of the men who exercised five or more times a week and in 14 percent of those who did not exercise, Djousse said. Smoking played a surprisingly small role, probably because its incidence was not high among the participants. "

In Women

The women's study looked at the association between high blood pressure -- a significant risk factor for heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular problems -- and six lifestyle factors: obesity, exercise, alcohol intake, use of non-narcotic painkillers, adherence to a diet designed to prevent high blood pressure and intake of supplemental folic acid. All six were found to be associated with the risk of developing high blood pressure in the 14-year study, and the association was cumulative.

Women who followed advice on all six factors had an 80 percent lower incidence of high blood pressure than those who followed none of the rules. Obesity was the most important risk factor.
 

While the clear message of both studies is that a healthy lifestyle prevents a number of illnesses, what is often overlooked is that the choice of a healthy lifestyle is not a purely individual decision. SO make that healthy choice for a healthy Lifestyle.

 


 
Disclaimer:
All content included on this TeluguOne.com Portal including text, graphics, images, videos and audio clips, is the property of ObjectOne Information Systems Ltd. or our associates, and protected by copyright laws. The collection, arrangement and assembly of all content on this portal/ related channels is the exclusive property of ObjectOne Information Systems Ltd. or our associates and protected copyright laws.
 
You may not copy, reproduce, distribute, publish, display, perform, modify, create derivative works, transmit, or in any other way exploit any part of copyrighted material without permission from ObjectOne Information Systems Ltd or our associates.